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Can You Put Vinyl Siding Over Lead Based Paint? (How To)

Man painting the Siding of the house

Lead-based paint dries quickly, maintains a fresh appearance, and resists moisture. However, it’s environmentally hazardous and toxic; thus, the US congress discontinued its use in 1978. If your home was constructed earlier than 1978, there are high chances it was painted using lead paint.

You can control the release of hazardous components by lead by removing, encapsulating, or enclosing them. However, eliminating lead is expensive and may require a professional.

On the other hand, encapsulating may eventually wear off. Hence, enclosing is the best method of controlling lead paint hazards. It involves putting a material over the lead paint to prevent the release of toxic dust.

So, is vinyl siding an excellent material to cover lead paint?

You can put vinyl siding over lead paint to prevent toxic emissions. Scrape off the loose paint and clean the area with water and soap. Dry the area and apply a sheathing material to form a flat surface. Install a moisture barrier before putting the vinyl siding.

Read the rest of the article to learn everything about putting vinyl siding over lead paint, including the problems you will likely encounter, the tools you need, preparations, and the step-by-step process of putting vinyl siding over lead paint.

Should You Put Vinyl Siding Over Lead-Based Paint?

Siding of the house

Installing vinyl siding over lead paint is an excellent way of preventing the emission of toxic dust and avoiding the cost of removing the paint. However, this doesn’t mean the process is smooth and free of challenges. The section below identifies the common problems to look out for when putting vinyl siding over lead paint and suggests ways to avoid them.

When putting vinyl siding over lead paint, you will likely face warping, buckling, fading, cracking, noise, and moisture issues. Prepare the surface adequately and install the vinyl siding correctly. Install a moisture barrier to avoid these problems.

Although vinyl siding has a level of UV protection, it fades over time due to exposure to sunlight. Hence, you will notice discoloration in areas exposed to direct sunlight. You can prevent discoloration by choosing lighter colors that will not show stains and cleaning your siding regularly. Get a professional to paint your vinyl siding and plant trees near your house to provide shade and prevent these problems.

Vinyl siding can warp or buckle due to incorrect installation. Vinyl expands due to heat in summer and contracts in winter. You can prevent this issue by insulating your siding. Avoid nailing too tightly to leave room for expansion and contraction. Do not put a grill or oven near the vinyl siding; install a tight seal to prevent this issue.

Vinyl siding usually makes noise. However, nailing too loosely can increase the noise and damage the siding. You can prevent this by correct installation. Poor installation, impact, and continuous exposure to sunlight can cause cracking of vinyl siding. As a result, moisture may seep through the cracks and cause rot, molds, and mildew. You can prevent this problem by installing a moisture barrier when putting vinyl over lead paint.

Copyright protected content owner: ReadyToDIY.com and was initially posted on December 29, 2022.

What Tools Do You Need To Put Vinyl Over Lead-Based Paint?

Tools for siding

Installing vinyl siding over lead-based paint is a simple DIY process that can be successful when you have the right tools. The following section identifies the must-have tools to complete this project.

To put vinyl siding over lead-based paint, you should have a hammer, a level, a square, a chalk line, a tape measure, a hand saw, a utility knife, tinsnips, safety gear, a power saw, and a step ladder. Check your toolbox and order what you lack from your nearest hardware store or online.

You should have a tape measure to take measurements of the area you need to install vinyl siding and a chalk line to mark where you want to begin the installation. Lead-based paint is toxic; thus, you will need goggles, gloves, and a dust mask.

You will need a step ladder to reach higher parts of the house and a hammer to drive nails in and out of the vinyl siding. A utility knife will be handy for trimming vinyl siding, while a tin snip will be helpful when making precise cuts and shaping vinyl before installation. You can cut vinyl siding using a hand saw, but the process will be slower than when you use a power saw.

What Preparations Do You Need To Put Vinyl Siding Over Lead-Based Paint?

Siding of the house

If your home has areas with old lead-based paint, installing vinyl siding is an excellent way of covering the area to prevent the spread of hazards. However,  it’s a delicate process requiring adequate preparation. The following section outlines the preparations you need to complete this project.

Copyright article owner is ReadyToDiy.com for this article. This post was first published on December 29, 2022.

To put vinyl siding over lead-based paint, find out your state requirements. Cover the ground with ten mil plastic and seal it off from children. Remove chipping paint, and repair any faults. Clean the area and allow it to dry. Measure and calculate how much vinyl siding you require to complete the project.

Some states require you to have an inspector look at the status of the lead-based paint. Therefore, you should find out from your local health department. Seal off the area from children and place ten mil plastic on the surrounding ground to catch paint flakes.

Use a wire brush to remove loose or chipping paint, and inspect the wall for any cracks or loose nails. Check for any moisture issues and fix them before installing vinyl siding. Clean the area with soap and water to remove any dust. Degrease the wall and allow it to dry.

Use a tape measure to take measurements of the area and use them to determine the number of vinyl sidings you need to complete the project. Choose the type of siding you want and order them from your nearest hardware, home improvement store, or online.

How To Put Vinyl Siding Over Lead-Based Paint

confused man standing

If you do it correctly, you can successfully enclose lead-based paint with vinyl siding and prevent further hazardous emissions. Read the section below to learn how to put vinyl siding over lead-based paint.

To put vinyl siding over lead-based paint, apply a waterproofing sheath below, on the sides, above, and plywood or OSB to create a flat surface. Install the starter strip, corner posts, the J channel, and vinyl sidings to complete the process.

You can put vinyl siding over lead-based paint in the following steps.

Step 1: Apply a waterproof sheathing below, on the sides and above, and install plywood or OSB to create a flat surface.

Step 2: Install the starter strip to mark where to begin putting vinyl siding.

Step 3: Install corner posts on each of the house’s four corners.

Step 4: Apply flashing tape on the doors and windows and measure and cut the J channel.

Step 5: Measure and cut the vinyl sidings.

Step 6: Nail the vinyl sidings on the wall while leaving a quarter-inch space between the edges and the corner post to allow for expansion.

Step 7: Measure, cut, and install sidings on the windows.

Step 8: Measure, cut, and install siding on the top row to complete the process.

You can cover lead paint with vinyl siding to stop hazardous emissions. Seal the area and place a plastic sheath to collect paint chips. Remove any loose paint, wash the area with soap and water and let it dry. Before installing the vinyl siding, create a smooth surface using sheathing material and create a moisture barrier.

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ReadyToDIY is the owner of this article. This post was published on December 29, 2022.

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